Lake Mainit Biodiversity Partnerships Project

Site for the Lake Mainit Key Biodiversity Area

FAQs

 What is Biodiversity?

Published on Monday, 07 January 2013 04:03
Written by Paul S. De Quiros

Everything is inter-connected. This delicately balanced inter-relationship, referred to as the web of life, provides food, fresh water, wood, fiber, genetic resources, medicines, and ornamental and cultural products, and fuel such as firewood, security from natural and human-made disasters, and other life supporting and enhancing systems and processes.

We are part of biodiversity. Every member of the community plays an essential role in keeping the web of life. People, as part of the ecosystem, are integral component of biodiversity. Even within the urban life, where people may appear as detached from the “natural” environment, human communities remain intimately connected with ecosystems and their processes through their diets, recreational activities, use of materials, water and a lot other services and benefits obtained from biodiversity resources and ecosystems.

Why care about biodiversity?

Published on Monday, 07 January 2013 04:03
Written by Paul S. De Quiros

Everything is inter-connected. This delicately balanced inter-relationship, referred to as the web of life, provides food, fresh water, wood, fiber, genetic resources, medicines, and ornamental and cultural products, and fuel such as firewood, security from natural and human-made disasters, and other life supporting and enhancing systems and processes.

We are part of biodiversity. Every member of the community plays an essential role in keeping the web of life. People, as part of the ecosystem, are integral component of biodiversity. Even within the urban life, where people may appear as detached from the “natural” environment, human communities remain intimately connected with ecosystems and their processes through their diets, recreational activities, use of materials, water and a lot other services and benefits obtained from biodiversity resources and ecosystems.

What are the threats to biodiversity?

Published on Monday, 07 January 2013 04:03
Written by Paul S. De QuirosBiodiversity is threatened.

Some of the main causes are the current rate of species extinction; habitat loss, habitat fragmentation, climate change, pollution and over-utilization of natural resources.

In the country, fragmentation of natural forests is the major threat to our globally significant biodiversity resources. Fragmentation is seen in the continued loss of forest cover at the rate of 2.1% yearly during the 2000 to 2005, considered the second fastest in Southeast Asia. Causes of forest loss and fragmentation include agricultural expansion, forest-related activities, mining and land conversion.

Philippine Biodiversity

Published on Monday, 07 January 2013 04:03
Written by Paul S. De Quiros

The Philippines is considered to be one of the world’s most biologically rich countries. Its marine waters support the richest coral reef communities on the planet and its terrestrial ecosystems are similarly diverse, supporting a wealth of natural resources and a rich array of species diversity. It is one of the world’s 17 mega-diversity countries, which together host more than 70% of the world’s species. Together with Madagascar, it is also one of the only two countries in the world which are both a mega- diverse country and a global conservation hotspot.

The entire country comprises a Conservation International Hotspot, and all remaining forest and coastal areas fall within one of four WWF Global 200 Eco-regions. This makes the Philippines one of the planet’s highest conservation priorities. The country is home to a vast assemblage of species, many of them found nowhere else in the world. The Philippines has among the highest rates of species discovery in the world (sixteen new species of mammals have been discovered in the last ten years alone). New species are being discovered at a remarkable rate and this pattern shows no sign of slowing.

Current taxonomic estimates show that the Philippines has the highest level of endemism in the Indo-Malayan Realm on a per unit-area basis and the highest concentration of biodiversity on earth.